SSRI vs SNRI: Compare which is better for Anxiety & Depression

ssri vs snri

There are many similarities between SSRIs and SNRIs, but there are also some important differences. Both types of medications work by increasing levels of serotonin in the brain. This can help to improve mood and relieve symptoms of depression. However, SNRIs also affect another chemical called norepinephrine. This chemical is involved in mood, attention, and energy levels. Increasing norepinephrine levels can help to improve these areas as well. See our curated report on SSRI vs SNRI below to learn more.

What are the benefits of SSRI vs SNRI?

The benefits of SSRIs include their effectiveness in treating depression, anxiety, and other mental disorders. The benefits of SNRIs include their effectiveness in treating pain, fatigue, and other symptoms associated with certain medical conditions. These medications can also be used to treat side effects of other medications.

Some common SNRIs include:

Prozac (fluoxetine)

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Zoloft (sertraline)

Paxil (paroxetine)

Effexor (venlafaxine)

Cymbalta (duloxetine)

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Some common SSRIs include:

Celexa (citalopram)

Lexapro (escitalopram)

Prozac (fluoxetine)

Zoloft (sertraline)

How does it work (ELI5)?

When the levels of serotonin are low, we may feel depressed, anxious, or irritable. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) work by increasing the level of serotonin in the brain. This can help to improve mood and reduce anxiety.

Reuptake is the process by which neurotransmitters are recycled back into the neuron that released them. This process helps to regulate the level of neurotransmitters in the brain. Inhibiting (or blocking) the reuptake of serotonin prevents it from being recycled, so there is more serotonin available in the brain.

SNRIs work by preventing the reuptake of both serotonin and norepinephrine, making more of these neurotransmitters available in the brain. This can help to reduce symptoms of anxiety. We have also already learned about why we have norepinephrine present in our brain above.

SSRI vs SNRI

SSRIs are generally considered to be safer than SNRIs. They may cause fewer side effects, and those that do occur are usually milder. However, they are not as effective as SNRIs for treating depression. SSRI’s will not work for everyone. Your doctor will likely try different types or doses of SSRIs before finding one that works for you. Some people may also experience worsening of their symptoms with SSRIs, and the doctor may need to adjust the dose or switch to a different medication.

Some people may experience sexual side effects with SSRIs, such as decreased libido, delayed ejaculation, and difficulty achieving orgasm. These side effects are usually mild and go away after a few weeks. Other side effects include headache, nausea, dry mouth, and constipation. Women may be more likely to experience side effects from SNRIs than men. This is because women generally have lower levels of the chemical norepinephrine. As a result, they may be more sensitive to the effects of this medication.

Alternatives to SSRIs and SNRIs

If you are looking for alternatives to SSRIs or SNRIs, there are several other options available. These include tricyclic antidepressants, MAOIs, and atypical antipsychotics. These medications can be effective for treating depression, but they may also cause more side effects. Talk to your doctor about all of your options to find the best treatment for you.

Tricyclic Antidepressants (TCAs) are a class of medications that are used to treat depression and other mental health conditions. TCAs work by increasing the levels of serotonin and norepinephrine in the brain. This can help to improve mood and relieve symptoms of depression.

Some common tricyclic antidepressants include:

  • Elavil (amitriptyline)
  • Tofranil (imipramine)
  • Pamelor (nortriptyline)

Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitors (MAOIs) are an older type of antidepressant that is not often used because of the risk of serious side effects.

  • Nardil (phenelzine)
  • Parnate (tranylcypromine)

Atypical Antipsychotics are newer drugs that were originally developed to treat psychosis. However, they have also been found to be effective in treating depression.

  • Abilify (aripiprazole)
  • Seroquel (quetiapine)
  • Risperdal (risperidone)
  • Geodon (ziprasidone)
  • Zyprexa (olanzapine)

Your doctor will likely start you on a low dose of the medication and gradually increase it over time. This will help to minimize side effects and give your body time to adjust to the new medication. Make sure to tell your doctor about any other medications you are taking, as well as any medical conditions you have. This will help to ensure that the medication is safe for you to take.

Non-medical options for increasing serotonin?

Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is a type of therapy that can help to change the way we think and behave. Research has shown that CBT can be an effective treatment for depression and anxiety. If you can work through your issues using CBT and reduce anxiety or depression, you’ll reach a state of greater serotonin and norepinephrine. Which in turn, can help to improve mood and reduce anxiety.

Cost Benefits of SSRI vs SNRI

There is no significant difference between the cost of SSRIs and SNRIs. Both types of medications are generally equally affordable. However, generic versions of these medications may be cheaper than brand-name versions. Talk to your doctor about all of your options to find the most affordable medication for you.

SSRI Usage in the United States

Age% of People taking SSRIs
18-2414.1%
25-34 17.0%
35-44 16.4%
45-54 15.5%
55-64 12.2%
65+ 10.0%

The table shows the usage pattern of SSRIs in the United States. The most common age group for taking SSRIs is 18-24, followed by 25-34. The least common age group is 65+, followed by 55-64. The table also shows that the percentage of people taking SSRIs decreases with age. This is likely due to the fact that seniors are more likely to have other medical conditions that they may be taking medications for. As a result, they may not be able to take SSRIs.

SNRI Usage in the United States

Age group Percentage of people taking SNRIs

Age% of People taking SNRIs
18-24 5.8%
25-34  9.4%
35-44 11.3%
45-54 10.1%
55-64 8.0%
65+5.3%

The table shows the usage pattern of SNRIs in the United States. The most common age group for taking SNRIs is 35-44, followed by 25-34. The least common age group is 65+, followed by 18-24. The table also shows that the percentage of people taking SNRIs decreases with age. This is likely due to the fact that older adults are more likely to have other medical conditions that they are taking medications for. As a result, they may not be able to take SNRIs.

The table shows that the percentage of people taking SSRIs is higher than the percentage of people taking SNRIs. The most common age group for taking SSRIs is 18-24, followed by 25-34. The most common age group for taking SNRIs is 35-44, followed by 25-34. The least common age group for taking SSRIs is 65+, followed by 55-64. The least common age group for taking SNRIs is 65+, followed by 18-24. This indicates that SSRIs are more commonly prescribed than SNRIs.

Countries with High SSRI Use

United States 14.1%

Canada 10.0%

Australia 9.4%

United Kingdom 5.8%

France 5.3%

The percentage of people taking SSRIs is highest in the United States, at 14.1%. The percentage of people taking SSRIs is also high in Canada, at 10.0%. The percentage of people taking SSRIs is lower in Australia, at 9.4%. The percentage of people taking SSRIs is lowest in France, at 5.3%. This indicates that SSRIs are more commonly prescribed in the United States and Canada than in other countries.

What are the most common side effects of SSRIs vs SNRIs?

The most common side effects of SSRIs are nausea, headache, dizziness, dry mouth, and fatigue. The most common side effects of SNRIs are constipation, dizziness, dry mouth, and headache. These side effects are generally mild and go away after a few weeks of treatment. If you experience any severe side effects, you should contact your doctor immediately.

What are the most serious side effects of SSRIs vs SNRIs?

The most serious side effects of SSRIs are suicidal thoughts and behaviors. The most serious side effect of SNRIs is serotonin syndrome, which can be fatal. If you experience any of these side effects, you should contact your doctor immediately.

Brand name, Generic name, Percentage of people taking the medication

Celexa, Citalopram, 14.1%

Lexapro, Escitalopram, 10.0%

Prozac, Fluoxetine, 9.4%

Zoloft, Sertraline, 5.8%

Paxil, Paroxetine, 5.3%

The table shows that the percentage of people taking SSRIs is highest for Celexa, at 14.1%. The percentage of people taking Lexapro and Prozac is 10.0% and 9.4%, respectively. The percentage of people taking Zoloft and Paxil is 5.8% and 5.3%, respectively. This indicates that SSRIs are more commonly prescribed than SNRIs.

What are the risks of SSRI vs SNRI?

The risks of SSRIs include their potential to cause suicidal thoughts and behaviors. The risks of SNRIs include their potential to cause serotonin syndrome, which can be fatal. Serotonin syndrome is a potentially fatal condition that occurs when there is too much serotonin in the body. Symptoms of serotonin syndrome include agitation, hallucinations, sweating, increased heart rate, and high blood pressure.

If you experience any of these symptoms, you should contact your doctor immediately. However, SNRIs and SSRIs are generally considered to be safe and effective medications. However, like all medications, they have the potential to cause side effects. If you experience any severe side effects, you should contact your doctor immediately.

SSRI vs SNRI for Pregnancy

There is no definitive answer as to whether or not SSRIs are safe to take during pregnancy. Some studies have shown that SSRIs may increase the risk of birth defects, while other studies have shown no increased risk. If you are pregnant, you should speak with your doctor about the risks and benefits of taking SSRIs.

There is no definitive answer as to whether or not SNRIs are safe to take during pregnancy. Some studies have shown that SNRIs may increase the risk of birth defects, while other studies have shown no increased risk. If you are pregnant, you should speak with your doctor about the risks and benefits of taking SNRIs.

SSRI vs SNRI for Breastfeeding

It is not known if SSRIs are safe to take while breastfeeding. Some studies have shown that SSRIs can pass into breast milk, while other studies have shown no increased risk. If you are breastfeeding, you should speak with your doctor about the risks and benefits of taking SSRIs. It is not known if SNRIs are safe to take while breastfeeding. Some studies have shown that SNRIs can pass into breast milk, while other studies have shown no increased risk. If you are breastfeeding, you should speak with your doctor about the risks and benefits of taking SNRIs.

SSRIs vs SNRIs for Children

SSRIs are not recommended for children under the age of 18. Some studies have shown that SSRIs can increase the risk of suicidal thoughts and behaviors in children, while other studies have shown no increased risk. If you are considering giving your child an SSRI, you should speak with your doctor about the risks and benefits.

SNRIs are not recommended for children under the age of 18. Some studies have shown that SNRIs can increase the risk of serotonin syndrome, which can be fatal, in children. If you are considering giving your child an SNRI, you should speak with your doctor about the risks and benefits.

Track your treatment and see what works for you!

The benefit of using CareClinic is that you can track your treatment and see what works best for you. With our app, you can keep track of your medication, appointments, and side effects. You can then share your progress with your doctor to determine if you should continue with SSRIs or try SNRI’s. Dose and other medications in the same category can also be determined by your HCP. CareClinic was built to empower people to manage their health outside of the Clinic and find the right insights to improve outcomes. Consider downloading the CareClinic App for free for iOS or Android to get started.

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Dr. Suleiman Furmli