Elderly Blood Pressure Chart: See What’s Normal and What Isn’t!

A blood pressure chart is a handy tool that can be used to track and monitor changes in blood pressure over time. This information can be useful for both medical professionals and patients, as it can help to identify trends and potential problems early on. The chart includes columns for systolic and diastolic readings, as well as a column for the date and time of each reading. If you are looking to find out if your loved one’s blood pressure falls within range, see the elderly blood pressure chart and additional tips below. Consider downloading the CareClinic app to log their values to monitor their health or treatment progression and for safekeeping.

Why is high blood pressure called a silent killer?

High blood pressure is often called a silent killer because it can cause damage to the body without any obvious symptoms. This means that many people who have high blood pressure may not even know it, until they experience problems such as a heart attack or stroke. A rapid pulse, sweating, and headache are just a few of the symptoms that may be experienced in an emergency. If you think you may be experiencing these symptoms, it is important to seek medical help immediately.

Remember, maintaining a healthy weight is one of the best things you can do to lower your blood pressure. Being overweight or obese puts extra strain on your heart and blood vessels, which can lead to hypertension. Losing even a small amount of weight can make a big difference in your blood pressure readings. So if you’re carrying around a few extra pounds, now is the time to start shedding them!

How to measure blood pressure

There are two ways to check your blood pressure: using a manual or automatic blood pressure monitor. A manual blood pressure monitor consists of a cuff that is inflated with air and wrapped around your upper arm. As the cuff deflates, it measures your systolic and diastolic blood pressure readings. If you are unsure, you can also learn how to measure your blood pressure the correct way.

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How to Understand Blood Pressure Chart

Using the blood pressure chart is simple. First, take a blood pressure reading using a standard blood pressure cuff. Next, record the date, time, and readings in the appropriate columns. Be sure to note any other relevant information, such as medications or other health conditions. Repeat this process over time, and you will have a valuable record of your blood pressure readings that can be used to track changes and identify trends.

Elderly Blood Pressure Chart

Average Blood Pressure Chart by Age and Gender
Age in yearsFemaleMale
19-24120/79120/79
25-29120/80121/80
30-35122/81123/82
36-39123/81124/83
40-45124/83125/83
46-49126/84127/84
50-55129/85128/85
56-59130/86131/87
60+134/84135/88

 

Elderly Blood pressure chart by ages 60-80 for females

Blood Pressure Chart for 60-80 year olds
Age in yearsSystolic (mmHg)Diastolic (mmHg)
60-65130 +/- 1580 +/10
66-70135 +/- 1585 +/- 10
71-75140 +/- 1590 +/- 10
76-80145 +/- 1595 +/- 10

Elderly Blood pressure chart by ages 60-80 for males

Blood Pressure Chart for 60-80 years
Age in yearsSystolic (mmHg)Diastolic (mmHg)
60-64<130<80
65-69130-13980-89
70-74140-15990-99
75-79160-179100-109
80-84>180>110

Source: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2007-2010. JAMA. 2011;305(19):1971-1979

Blood Pressure Guidelines & Tips

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The American Heart Association (AHA) has released new blood pressure guidelines for blood pressure in adults, which are based on recent scientific evidence. The guidelines lower the threshold for what is considered high blood pressure, from 140/90 mmHg to 130/80 mmHg. This means that more people will now be considered to have high blood pressure, and will need to take steps to lower their blood pressure.

If you have been diagnosed with high blood pressure, there are a few things you can do to manage it and keep your readings in the healthy range.

  • Be sure to have your blood pressure checked regularly, at least once every two years.
  • If you are over the age of 80, be sure to have your blood pressure checked more frequently, as this is a high risk group for hypertension.
  • If you have hypertension, work with your doctor to develop a treatment plan. This may include lifestyle changes, such as eating a healthy diet and getting regular exercise, as well as medication.
  • Monitor your blood pressure at home using a digital blood pressure monitor. This can help you to keep track of your progress and identify any potential problems early on.

This elderly blood pressure chart above is based on averages and should only be used as a general guide. Individual blood pressure values may vary depending on factors such as health status, medications, and lifestyle choices. These values in this table were established by the American Heart Association.

Blood Pressure Variability

There is some normal variability in blood pressure readings. This means that a single reading may not accurately reflect a person’s true blood pressure. A person’s blood pressure may be higher or lower at different times of the day, and it may also vary from day to day. For this reason, it is important to take multiple readings over time and to track trends, rather than relying on a single reading.

What do the blood pressure numbers mean?

The top number is your systolic pressure. This is the highest level your blood pressure reaches as your heart pumps blood out to the rest of your body. The bottom number is your diastolic blood pressure. This is the lowest level your blood pressure reaches as your heart rests between beats.

What is normal blood pressure?

Normal blood pressure is defined as a systolic blood pressure of less than 120 and a diastolic blood pressure of less than 80. These values are based on averages and may vary depending on factors such as age, health status, medications, and lifestyle choices.

High blood pressure is defined as a systolic blood pressure of 140 or higher and/or a diastolic pressure of 90 or higher. These values are also based on averages, and they may vary depending on the same factors as above.

What is low blood pressure and elevated blood pressure range?

The best way to understand blood pressure readings is to look at them in ranges. That way you can see where your blood pressure falls and what category it falls into.

Low blood pressure, or hypotension, is defined as a systolic blood pressure of 90 or less and/or a diastolic blood pressure of 60 or less. This is considered to be a low reading. These values are based on averages and may vary depending on factors such as age, health status, medications, and lifestyle choices.

Elevated blood pressure is defined as systolic blood pressure between 120-129 and/or a diastolic pressure of less than 80. These values are also based on averages and may vary depending on the same factors as above.

Do the blood pressure values remain the same in seniors?

The answer is no. According to the American Heart Association, the ideal blood pressure values for seniors are a systolic blood pressure of less than 150 and a diastolic blood pressure of less than 90.

The reason is that as we age, our blood vessels become less flexible and more resistant to the flow of blood. This can cause an increase in blood pressure. So, while the ideal values may be different, it is still important to track trends over time and to consult with a doctor to discuss your individual blood pressure goals. American college of cardiology recommends the same values.

What are some things that can cause high blood pressure in seniors?

Some things that can cause high blood pressure in seniors include Obesity, lack of exercise because of chronic illness, side effects from medications, smoking, excessive alcohol consumption, stress, poor diet and sleep apnea.

What are some lifestyle changes that can help manage high blood pressure in the elderly?

Some lifestyle changes that can help manage high blood pressure in the elderly include: losing weight if obese, exercising regularly, eating a healthy diet, limiting alcohol intake, quitting smoking, and reducing stress. Remember if a digital solution is not an option for tracking blood pressure, you can always try printable blood pressure tracking charts.

Are there any medications that can help treat high blood pressure levels for the elderly?

Yes, many medications can help manage high blood pressure in seniors. Some common medications include: diuretics, ACE inhibitors, beta-blockers, and calcium channel blockers. Diuretics are used to help the body get rid of excess water and salt. ACE inhibitors help to relax blood vessels and reduce blood pressure. Beta-blockers work by slowing down the heart rate and reducing the force of heart contractions. Calcium channel blockers prevent calcium from entering into the muscles of the heart and blood vessels, which helps to relax the blood vessels and reduce blood pressure.

To track this medication you can use CareClinic app. It will help you to remember to take your medication, track your blood pressure, and provide information to your doctor. The App is free and available on iPhone and Android and can be downloaded by tapping the button at the top of the screen.

What should I do if my blood pressure is high?

If you have been diagnosed with high blood pressure, it is important to follow your doctor’s treatment plan. This may include lifestyle changes, such as eating a healthy diet and exercising regularly, as well as taking medication. You should also have your blood pressure checked regularly to make sure that it remains under control.

If left untreated, high blood pressure can lead to serious health problems, such as heart disease, stroke, and kidney failure. Therefore, it is important to take steps to control your blood pressure and keep it at a healthy level.

Lifestyle Factors & Changes

The DASH diet (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) is an eating plan that has been shown to lower blood pressure. The DASH diet is rich in fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and low-fat dairy foods and low in unhealthy saturated fat and cholesterol. To learn more about the DASH diet visit: https://www.dashdiet.org/

To follow the DASH diet, you should eat more vegetables. Choose fresh vegetables with no added salt or sugar. Aim for at least four servings of vegetables per day. Try to eat more whole grains. Choose whole-grain breads, pasta, and rice. Consider eating less sodium. Cut back on foods that are high in sodium, such as cured meats, bacon, sausage, lunch meats, cheeses, gravies, and sauces. Try to also go for more “Grass-fed” options if you do want to indulge.

Drink less alcohol. If you drink alcohol, limit it to two drinks per day for men and one drink per day for women. Another life style change would be to exercise regularly. People who exercise regularly tend to have lower blood pressure than those who do not exercise. To get the most benefit from exercise, aim for at least 30 minutes of moderate-intensity activity most days of the week. Moderate-intensity activities include walking, biking, and swimming. You can also break up your exercise into shorter periods of 10 minutes or more.

Hypertension categories

is a common complication of diabetes. High blood sugar levels cause damage to the blood vessels, which can lead to high blood pressure. If you have diabetes, it is important to control your blood sugar levels and BP to prevent serious health complications. Living a healthy lifestyle and lowering risk factors such as obesity, high cholesterol, and smoking can help to control blood pressure in older adults. Hypertension stage 1 is when your systolic reading (the top number) is between 130 and 139 or your diastolic reading (the bottom number) is between 80 and 89. This is considered elevated blood pressure. Stage 2 hypertension is when your systolic reading is 140 or higher, or your diastolic reading is 90 or higher. This is considered high blood pressure.

Common Conditions linked to BP

Chronic Kidney disease (CKD) is a common condition that can cause high blood pressure. CKD is a condition in which the kidneys are damaged and cannot filter blood properly. If you have CKD, it is important to control your BP to prevent further damage to the kidneys.

Heart failure is a condition in which the heart is unable to pump enough blood to the rest of the body. This can cause fluid to build up in the lungs and other organs, leading to high blood pressure. If you have heart failure, it is important to control your BP to prevent further damage to the heart and other organs.

Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is a condition in which the arteries that supply blood to the legs and feet become narrowed or blocked. This can cause pain and cramping in the legs and feet and can lead to high blood pressure. If you have PAD, it is important to control your BP.

Which blood pressure monitor works with Apple Health?

There are many blood pressure monitors that work with Apple Health. To find a list of compatible devices, you can go to the Apple app store and search for “blood pressure.” Alternatively, you can visit the website of a specific blood pressure monitor manufacturer to see if their devices are compatible with Apple Health.

Some popular BP measuring devices:

MonitorRatingReview
Withings BPM4.5 starsThe device is very user-friendly and it was very easy to set up. I love that it automatically logs my readings into the app and syncs with my Apple Health app.
QardioArm4 starsIt is a wearable device that can be worn on the upper arm and tracks blood pressure, heart rate, and breathing.
A&D Medical UA-767PBT Automatic Blood Pressure Monitor4.1 stars“is a great blood pressure monitor that works with Apple Health.”
Omron BP710N 3 Series Upper Arm Blood Pressure Monitor4.5 starsOmron has always been a reliable brand for blood pressure monitors, and the BP710N 3 Series is no exception. This monitor is easy to use, accurate and comes with a lot of features that are great for people with hypertension.
Panasonic EW3109W Portable Upper Arm Blood Pressure Monitor4.5 stars“I was looking for a portable blood pressure monitor to take on vacation with me and this one worked great.”
iHealth Ease Wireless Blood Pressure Monitor3.5 stars..an easy and convenient way to monitor their blood pressure. The device is very simple to use and can be operated by anyone

As you can see, many blood pressure monitors work with Apple Health. All of the monitors listed above have high ratings and positive reviews. If you are looking for a blood pressure monitor, these are all great options to consider. They also have a google fit integration

When do you measure heart rate vs blood pressure?

You should measure your heart rate when you are at rest and your blood pressure when you are active. Your heart rate is a good indicator of your overall fitness level and can help you gauge how hard you should be working when you are active. Your blood pressure is a good indicator of how much stress your body is under and can help you gauge whether or not you are at risk for hypertension.

Aside from blood pressure, what else should you monitor for the elderly?

There are a few other things that you should monitor for the elderly in your family or dependents, such as their cholesterol levels, high cholesterol is a risk factor for heart disease.

You can also log blood sugar levels, high blood sugar levels can damage the blood vessels and lead to hypertension or other complications. Along with sugar, It is also important to monitor weight, as obesity is a risk factor for many chronic conditions such as heart disease, stroke, and diabetes.

Body mass index (BMI): A high BMI can indicate obesity, which is a risk factor for hypertension. Additionally, a large waist circumference can indicate abdominal obesity, which is a risk factor for hypertension as well. Monitoring these things can help you catch potential health problems early and take steps to prevent them from becoming serious.

How Can CareClinic help manage blood pressure for the elderly?

CareClinic app can help track blood pressure for the elderly by providing a way to track blood pressure, medication, and appointments. The app can also help to set reminders for taking medication and checking blood pressure. In addition, the app can provide information to your doctor about your blood pressure trends. It is free to try and available on iPhone and Android. Download it by tapping here.

 

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